donderdag, maart 31, 2016

Ida Ekblad


Ekblad’s painting studio is located on a peninsula just outside of Oslo, where she can make the most of Norway’s short summers. “One day this summer I had to figure out some titles, so I went down here with some books and sat in a bikini and wrote. Then I swam, and it felt so luxurious. This is the best studio ever.”






Among Ekblad’s methods for making bold lines: “I use silk stockings or women’s nylon stockings. I put this very dense paint which is just pigment into the stocking, and I draw with it. It’s almost like marker line, but it’s still faulty and strange.”










“I’ve been working with shopping carts for a long time in different ways,” says Ekblad. In the past, she used them to transport found objects for her sculptures. “Then I saw them in every art school. In art institutions, they have a life of their own outside of the supermarket.” They became sculptures themselves in her National Museum show, where she developed her “track” technique – pushing the painted wheels around on canvas to create prints. “I was like, this is a perfect line.“


Ekblad’s work is influenced by her poetry, though she tends to incorporate it indirectly in her shows. The words she carves into wheels for her track paintings overlap and fragment. “It all becomes chaotic.”


“I work as much with sculpture as with painting, but because this is such an amazing painting space, I’ve been wanting to just paint for a little while. There’s almost never direct sunlight. You get a really flush, beautiful light. It’s such bliss to come here, and be in this room, and experiment. Then after time, I really need to work with sculpture again. It’s an urge.”


An upper level in the studio helps Ekblad gain perspective. “I think you always need to get a distance from what you’re working on and see with fresh eyes. So I go up there quite a lot.”





"....
One look at Ida Ekblad’s studio and you might wonder how the Norwegian artist manages to do any work in this beautiful seaside spot near Oslo. We’d worry about getting distracted, or worse, growing complacent. But it hasn’t taken the edge off of Ekblad’s output. If anything, having such a large, light-filled space has allowed her to “experiment on a huge scale” with her process and materials.
...." (bron: Sight Unseen)

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