dinsdag, februari 23, 2016

Andy Goldsworthy #4


Eucalyptus branches from the Presidio installed before the formwork for the rammed earth wall is installed.


Rammers have reached the top of the rammed earth wall that surrounds the now buried eucalyptus branches.


Formwork is removed revealing a freshly packed rammed earth wall and the center point of the ball of gnarled eucalyptus branches. Both the raw earth for the rammed earth wall and the eucalyptus wood was sourced from the surrounding Presidio.


Andy Goldsworthy poses with the installation before beginning to dig out the earth surrounding the encased eucalyptus wood.


Andy Goldsworthy excavates the rammed earth from around the gnarled eucalyptus wood. (bron: Rammed Rarth Works)


Andy Goldsworthy: Eart Wall, 2014. (bron: DryStoneGarden)


Andy Goldsworthy chiseling a mock-up wall to test methods for distressing the rammed earth before the final installation is built.


Andy Goldsworthy chiseling the ends of a meandering curved mock-up rammed earth wall to test methods for distressing the rammed earth before the final installation is built.


Andy Goldsworthy and rammed earth builder David Easton atop the serpentine rammed earth mock-up wall discussing how the final project will be built.


A crane removing large aluminum and plywood panels panels from the experimental mock up rammed earth wall. The panels supported four foot by eight foot blocks of three-pound (recyclable) expanded polystyrene, each block wire cut to the wall's curve using a CNC machine.


The final project will be so complex that the Rammed Earth Works team invented and built an articulated, rolling conveyor to travel the length of the wall delivering the massive volume of earth to be rammed in the curving wall.


Ramming earth in the meandering curved wall. The final project's walls will be forty feet tall and one hundred feet long as the crow flies, one hundred and eighty feet long traveling along the curves.


Formwork of the curved mock-up wall. The final installation to be constructed next year will contain nearly 1000 cubic yards of loose soil - 27,000 cubic feet - pounded into six inch lifts.

"Sculptor Andy Goldsworthy, known for both his ephemeral and permanent installations, returned to northern California and the Rammed Earth Works studio to begin development on a monumentally permanent piece to be constructed next year for a private client. Known more for his work in stone, Andy chose rammed earth for this project because of the “inner warmth it radiates.” The large mockup was built to explore both the techniques to be used in the final construction next year and to explore the stratification and surface characteristics. The wall itself will combine the smooth, off-form finish inherent to densely compacted earth with the chiseled surfaces of a portal “tunneled” through the six-foot thick wall. Each end wall will appear to be broken off.
....
The wall itself will be HUGE - forty feet tall and one hundred feet long as the crow flies, one hundred and eighty feet long if you stay in the middle of the river. That’s nearly 1000 cubic yards of loose soil, 27,000 cubic feet - pounded into six inch lifts. The team has to invent and build an articulated, rolling delivery conveyor to travel the length of the wall and, for the first time ever, self-driving rammers that ride along a monorail mounted to the reinforcing steel. According to Khyber Easton, self-driving rammers have been in the works for several years, but took a project of this magnitude to evolve from the design studio and into the field (from the theoretical to the practical). The plan is to have both the rolling conveyors and the self driving rammers operated through remote control, giving the operator precise control over placement and compaction.
....
Now that the mock-up wall has been built and approved, the project waits for a final test from the predicted El Niño rains.
...." (bron: Rammed Rarth Works)

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